You will also find information on whether and for how long childhood diseases are contagious

You will also find information on whether and for how long childhood diseases are contagious

If a woman catches the parvovirus B19 during pregnancy, it can enter the bloodstream of the unborn child and cause a miscarriage.

The childhood diseases lexicon provides an overview of the most common childhood diseases. The articles explain symptoms, treatment and possible consequences of the teething problems. Parents find out which symptoms the child needs to see a doctor quickly and which diseases can also help with home remedies. You will also find information on whether and for how long childhood diseases are contagious. Some teething troubles can be prevented by vaccination. Our vaccination calendar also provides an overview of the vaccinations recommended by the Standing Vaccination Commission. 

Service for parents: Pediatrician search Teething diseases: Rubella are a danger for the unborn child Overview with table: How long is there a risk of infection?

You can also find us on Facebook – now a fan of ours "Parent world" will!

"Your child has epilepsy!" A diagnosis that parents first have to digest. If not recognized and treated, epileptic seizures can lead to serious problems in school and education.

more on the subject

Down syndrome: With good support for independence Selective mutism: When the child switches to mute Shapes, causes, spectrum: The environment remains locked out – that’s behind the disease

When one thinks of an epileptic seizure, the image of a person twitching on the floor with foam at the mouth comes to mind. But there are also completely different forms of epilepsy: febrile seizures as an example of so-called occasional seizures, but also absences, in which the affected person only seems rather dreamy.  

Epilepsy usually occurs in childhood

Five to ten percent of all people experience a one-time epileptic attack in the course of their life. For example, in the form of a febrile seizure in infancy, under the influence of alcohol or other types of poisoning. Only one percent of the population develops real epilepsy. That doesn’t sound like much, but at least it is the most common neurological disease in childhood. Three quarters of all epileptics have the first seizures at a young age.

Dysfunction in the brain

Epilepsy is caused by a dysfunction of the brain. Genetically caused epilepsy syndromes are most common in children: Biochemical changes in the cell membrane lead to increased excitability of the nerve cells with a normally non-occurring simultaneous discharge. However, malformations or hereditary structural changes in the brain, metabolic diseases, tumors and brain damage that occur, for example, during pregnancy or childbirth, can be the cause of epilepsy.

Modern techniques such as high-resolution magnetic resonance tomographs, long-term video EEG and special nuclear medicine examinations help with the diagnosis. 70 percent of patients can be relieved of their seizures with medication without major side effects or interactions. In about every tenth affected child, the epilepsy focus can also be operated on.

An increased readiness for seizures, i.e. the corresponding reaction to certain triggers, seems to be innate. Sleep deprivation, fever, flickering light or insufficient screen distance when watching TV or working on the computer often have an unfavorable effect.

Untreated epilepsy causes problems

Epilepsy has many faces. Some cause quite a stir, others express themselves in changes that are initially not even noticed. For example, the so-called absences are barely visible to outsiders. These are small film tears. The affected children seem to have stepped away for a short time, seem rather dreamy to outsiders. At some point, however, parents or educators usually notice that something is wrong.argumentative essay 6th grade

"With the absences you can see much more in the EEG than from the outside. Special waves occur much more frequently than one can observe seizures. Studies have shown that this also disrupts the flow of thought in the brain, which shows that treatment must be given. The probability of healing is then possibly also higher", explains Michael Fingerhut, senior physician at the Nuremberg South Clinic. If the disease is not recognized and treated, one must expect that there will be difficulties in school.

Seizures usually do not damage the brain

Epilepsies occur at different ages and can also heal at different times. Only with a few do they last a lifetime. In addition, epileptic seizures in childhood are very treatable and, contrary to popular belief, do not leave any consequential damage.

"Indeed", thimble restricts, "there are rare, severe epilepsies in which the seizures occur several times a day or last for a very long time and which can then lead to damage." But these are the exception, not the rule.

Epileptics are not mentally retarded

But especially the children who suffer from severe seizures with twitching are quickly labeled as mentally handicapped by the environment. There is not the slightest reason for this. Foxglove explains that there is no relationship between the intelligence quotient and epilepsy. However, he points out other connections: "From a purely statistical point of view, it is likely that other mild functional disorders such as concentration disorders or partial performance disorders are also present."

Most of the children affected by epilepsy show no further impairments and attend regular school without any problems. "Children with epilepsy mostly achieve the same level of success in primary, secondary and secondary schools, but sometimes have a higher need for care and therapy than their peers.

Epilepsy in and of itself must never be the sole criterion for attending a special needs school", informs the German Society for Epilepsy (DGfE). Compensation for disadvantages is not generally specified; this would not even be possible due to the very different clinical pictures. Here, however, the individual school administrators have a relatively large scope. 

Provide passive help

If a child has an epileptic seizure for the first time, it is best to call an ambulance because they should be thoroughly examined after the seizure. In children who are already known to have epilepsy, it is only necessary to call the emergency number if the seizure lasts more than five minutes or if several seizures occur in a row.

There is a need to hold the child during a seizure, to loosen their cramped limbs, or to shove something in their mouth to keep them from biting their tongue. All of that should be avoided. Instead, it is better to remove all objects in the immediate vicinity that could injure the child and to put a pillow under his head. 

If antispasmodic medication has already been prescribed, parents should ask their doctor to explain how and when to use them. After the seizure, it is important to explain to the child what has happened in the meantime. Because it has no memory of the incident. If it is possible, one should keep a log of the seizures and also specifically document what happened before. This helps the person affected because he can then recognize harbingers such as headaches, irritability or certain sensory perceptions. However, this also helps the treating doctor to determine the individual epilepsy and to find the right therapy. 

Epilepsy can heal

If no more seizures have occurred over a longer period of time and the EEG does not show any abnormalities, then it is at the discretion of the attending physician to reduce the medication or even to end the therapy. The good news is that in more than a quarter of children, epilepsy heals at some point due to further brain development. It is not uncommon for the seizure tendency to go away on its own after puberty.

Seizures: Epilepsy Symptoms – How To Recognize The Disease Epileptic Seizures: There are several causes of epilepsy in children

The childhood diseases lexicon provides an overview of the most common childhood diseases. The articles explain symptoms, treatment and possible consequences of the teething problems. Parents find out which symptoms the child needs to see a doctor quickly and which diseases can also help with home remedies. You will also find information on whether and for how long childhood diseases are contagious. Some teething troubles can be prevented by vaccination. Our vaccination calendar also provides an overview of the vaccinations recommended by the Standing Vaccination Commission. 

His mother alerted the ambulance because little Myron is apathetic, often cries and is constantly thirsty. Diabetes! He was just two years old when the doctors made the diagnosis. More and more children in Germany suffer from type 1 diabetes and the disease breaks out earlier and earlier. But the reasons are unclear.

Important articles on ADD / ADHD

Ritalin: ADHD – Hamburg leads the way in Ritalin prescription ADHD: These are the typical symptoms ADHD at school: How parents can help their children

"Why type 1 diabetes is increasing – you can still win a Nobel Prize for the answer", says Thomas Danne, chief physician at the children’s and youth hospital Auf der Bult in Hanover and CEO of "diabetesDE – German Diabetes Aid" before World Diabetes Day on November 14th. "It’s like a puzzle."

30,000 children with type 1 diabetes

Diabetes does not only affect the old and overweight. Little Ann-Fabienne is a competitive gymnast. She got seven "sugar". Luca was five. The "Diabetes Parent Journal" reports on the illness of both of them – and how they still lead a largely normal life.

Pregnancy – Prenatal stress can be harmful to babies

pregnancy
Prenatal stress can be harmful to babies

Age-related diseases can be favored. to the video

Diabetes is the most common metabolic disease in children. Around 30,000 under 18-year-olds in Germany suffer from type 1, and the number of new cases increases by two to four percent every year, depending on the source. The immune system derails and destroys the insulin-producing cells. In type 2, formerly known as adult diabetes, the insulin often does not work sufficiently due to being overweight, and at some point the body can no longer produce enough. This type plays a lesser role in children.

"Sweets don’t matter"

Finland has the largest number of children with diabetes 1. The reasons: unclear. "We know that certain viral diseases increase the risk", explains Danne. Around 20 genes are associated with type 1 diabetes. Vitamin D deficiency may play a role, presumably also nutritional components. "One thing is certain: sweets are irrelevant", Danne knows. "There are a lot of open questions."

Diabetes fundamentally changes everyday life

The youngest patients are small children – a great burden for families. Blood sugar has to be measured half a dozen times a day and insulin injected about four times. Sometimes the little ones have to be woken up at night. Growth, the urge to move around and infections affect the metabolism in unpredictable ways.

The fate of Jan also shows how strongly diabetes affects the everyday life of children and the whole family. He was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at kindergarten age – just in time. Today Jan is twelve years old and the illness essentially determines his life as well as that of his parents and siblings. Read his story here.

The risk of hypoglycaemia increases with alcohol consumption

In extreme cases, high sugar levels can be fatal. Hypoglycaemia is also dangerous, as it dulls consciousness. As children get older and take on responsibility, things don’t necessarily get easier. Danger especially in young adults: alcohol increases the risk of hypoglycaemia, as does the chemical drug ecstasy. "Someone danced through for three nights. If he then has extreme hypoglycaemia, nothing will save him"warns Danne. A 17-year-old noticed while sailing that he was falling into hypoglycaemia, he had told friends: "I have to eat, I’ll swim to the bank." He never got there, as Danne describes.

Type 2 diabetes isn’t the big problem in children

Type 2 diabetes is caused by genetic predisposition, obesity and a sedentary lifestyle. Six million Germans suffer from type 2. Here, too, more young people fall ill, but rarely children. "We have a problem with obesity and children. But diabetes is only the final stage", says the vice chairman of the Diabetes Research Group at the Helmholtz Center in Munich, Michael Hummel. "It is not true that type 2 diabetes is on the increase in children." But: "We are seeing more and more type 2 patients between the ages of 25 and 35."

"Colorful brochures" in Germany instead of a diabetes plan

In the fight against obesity, but also diabetes, 20 states have levied a compulsory levy on sugary drinks, others are thinking about it, such as Mexico. There are already more overweight people there than in the USA and almost one in ten people has diabetes.

A sugar tax, but also restrictions on the opening of fast food restaurants are also possible in Germany, believes Danne. Politicians are required. "What people like to do in Germany is printing colorful brochures. Other countries have a national diabetes plan." Help for families must be increased, schools better prepared.

No cure for type 1 diabetes: these options exist

Type 2 diabetes can be treated with weight loss and exercise. There is no recovery in type 1. "The only thing we can do is give insulin"says Danne. "What we can offer are technical solutions." Recently, patients tested an artificial pancreas for the first time at home. The device automatically measures the sugar in the tissue and delivers the correct amount of insulin. But it will take some time until it is ready for the market – perhaps a hope for children who are now diagnosed with diabetes.

The childhood diseases lexicon provides an overview of the most common childhood diseases.

Close Menu